Marian Bear Memorial Park

Marian Bear Memorial Park is a 3-mile lollipop path with an easy rating. It has several large oak trees that shade the route. Along the walk, keep an eye out for poison oak.
The trailhead is located behind the parking lot. You will pass beneath the motorway, and if it has been raining, there may be a seasonal creek that you will have to cross by jumping rocks.
Marian Bear Memorial Park stretches from Interstate 5 to Interstate 805 in San Clemente Canyon. Amid a bustling city, the park provides a natural backdrop. 
On the south side, finger canyons and mesas are part of the 467 acres of designated natural parks with a diverse and rich history. This location is named Clemente Canyon in honor of a Native American rancher in the late 1800s. Plans to build state Route 52 along the canyon bottom disturbed the natural equilibrium in the 1970s.
Marian Bear, an environmentalist and active community leader, fought diligently to save the canyons in their original condition. She pushed for the route to be realigned from the canyon bottom to the north slopes. Other community campaigns in the 1980s led to the inclusion of 72 acres to the southeast part, bringing the total to 467 acres.
The public has access to almost three miles of mainly level paths that run the canyon's length. The routes in multiple finger canyons rising to the mesa tops provide more difficult trekking. Bicycling is permitted on the canyon's maintenance roads while parking and picnic spaces with restrooms are accessible at the park's main entrances on Genesee Avenue and Regents Road.
Interpretive activities, public help, direction, enforcement, and protection are all provided by a Park Ranger assigned to the parking area. Volunteers are always welcome to help with park upkeep and operations.
In the park's San Clemente Canyon, there are various native plant groups, some of which are only found in Southern California and northern Baja California. There is riparian vegetation along the creek banks and side valleys where water runs. The slopes are home to coastal sage scrub and chaparral, two plant groups are known for their ability to withstand protracted drought and brush fires.

The City Council of San Diego rededicated Marian Bear, Memorial Park, On behalf of the city. Marian Bear's tireless and selfless work as a planner, naturalist, and environmentalist helped to ensure that open space is preserved for future generations.